Queen and Country, the latest feature film from renowned filmmaker John Boorman, will be released in Irish cinemas this Friday, June 12th.

The film has already received an IFTA Award for Best Original Score, for Stephen McKeon’s work. The composer and filmmakers have been kind enough to share 3 tracks from the score with us so that you can enjoy.

Queen and Country takes place in 1952. Bill Rowan is eighteen years old, dreaming his life away at the family’s riverside home, waiting to be called up for two years’ conscription in the British Army. His idyll is shattered by the harsh realities of boot camp. He meets Percy, an amoral prankster; they are rivals and antagonists, but they gradually forge a deep friendship in the claustrophobic environment of a closed, prison-like training camp. The pressure is briefly relieved by excursions into the outside world, where they both fall in love. Finally, Bill is confronted with the shattered lives of wounded boys returning from Korea.

Queen and Country made its debut at Directors Fortnight at the Cannes Film Festival in 2014. The film is a semi-autobiographical feature which serves as the sequel to Boorman’s 1987 film Hope and Glory, which was nominated for five Academy Awards® including Best Picture and Best Director.

Composer McKeon had previously received six IFTA nominations, winning in 2007 with another John Boorman film, The Tiger’s Tail. McKeon is also known for his work on The Clinic, Jack Taylor, Savage, Black Mirror, and Charlie. Find more of his work on http://stephenmckeon.com/

A Place to Dream – Stephen McKeon

End Credits – Stephen McKeon

Stealing the Clock – Stephen McKeon

Queen and Country will screen in the following cinemas:

  • Screen Dublin (D’Olier Street)
  • IMC Dun Laoghaire
  • IMC Carlow
  • IMC Tallaght
  • IMC Mullingar
  • IMC Galway
  • IMC Santry
  • IMC Enniskillen
  • IMC Ballymena

2 Responses

  1. Interview: John Boorman on Queen and Country –Scannain

    […] Stephen McKeon’s IFTA-winning score for Queen and Country is a handsome accompaniment to Boorman’s images, though you can never be sure what will work. “I’ve always had an ambivalent feeling towards music, but there are some instances in the cinema where scores have made a film.  Morricone’s an example. His music is absolutely crucial to the Spaghetti Westerns. They’re an identity for the film; they connect to them. I suppose I got that with ‘Duelling Banjos’. It’s so much entered the language, in a way.” […]

    Reply
  2. Interview: director John Boorman on QUEEN AND COUNTRY | The Film Cynic

    […] Stephen McKeon’s IFTA-winning score for Queen and Country is a handsome accompaniment to Boorman’s images, though you can never be sure what will work. “I’ve always had an ambivalent feeling towards music, but there are some instances in the cinema where scores have made a film.  Morricone’s an example. His music is absolutely crucial to the Spaghetti Westerns. They’re an identity for the film; they connect to them. I suppose I got that with ‘Duelling Banjos’. It’s so much entered the language, in a way.” […]

    Reply

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