Bernard Rose’s Frankenstein will screen exclusively at Triskel Christchurch Cinema, one night only, Thursday 18 February before its worldwide release on DVD. UK director Rose began his film career working with Jim Henson before directing music videos for MTV notable the uncensored version of Frankie Goes to Hollywood’s Relax. His later work includes horror film Candyman in 1992 the historical romance Immortal Beloved in 1994.

Frankenstein is as relevant today as when it first appeared nearly two hundred years ago,” says Bernard Rose. “Its central premise, that the goal of science is to create consciousness speaks to us because it is a fundamental truth and only in our era is the possibility now nearing fact. Mary Shelley’s book is of course the seminal Horror, Science Fiction and Gothic novel and as such has been adapted and interprated many times. None more memorably than James Whale’s classic film starring Boris Karloff. That film fixed the image of Frankenstein’s Monster but also contains a major distortion of Mary Shelly’s text. In the novel Victor Frankenstein digs up bodies to study them but nowhere does he say or claim that he is reanimating corpses. Victor’s ambition is to create life, but when challenged on the details of how he achieved this he coyly refuses to say in case someone else foolishly follows his method. Now of course the idea of moulding flesh using 3D printing is a reality and the concept of “creating life” takes on a new conviction.”

Rose enlisted longtime collaborator Danny Huston as Victor Frankenstein and acclaimed actress Carrie-Anne Moss as Elizabeth Frankenstein. “There could be no better Victor Frankenstein than Danny,” says Rose. “He embodies all the gravitas and questioning spirit wrapped in his silky smooth delivery and magnetic personality”. For the Monster, in this version initially a perfect adonis-like creation, Rose turned to Australian actor Xavier Samuel, who impressed so much in the Twilight saga films, and Adore. “Xavier is one of the best young actors of his generation,”says Rose, “and he threw himself into this role without holding back. There were grueling makeups and quite a few beatings he had to take, but Xavier handled it all without so much as a word of complaint. He gives the Monster asweetness and an innocence that is utterly beguiling, that is until he explodes with terrifying violence. It is a magnificent performance.”

Frankenstein’s only Irish screening takes place at Triskel Christchurch Cinema 9pm Thursday 18 February. Tickets on-sale now via http://triskelartscentre.ie/events/3175/frankenstein/.

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